Xanukkah, the one true spelling.

Xanukkah becomes a noteworthy transliteration in a scheme where each character in the target language represents a distinct character in the source language. Ch poses a problem if C and H represent unique characters unto themselves. X solves for this, but sort of breaks the rules of the target language (here being English).

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eli

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eli commented '@jeremycherfas Hebrew and I believe Arabic, but I’m not certain about any others...' on a post https://eli.li/entry.php?id=20171207022312

dgold

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dgold commented '@eli IPA agrees! [χanuˈka] in Hebrew, [ˈχanukə] in Yiddish' on a post https://eli.li/entry.php?id=20171207022312

jeremycherfas

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jeremycherfas commented '@eli Is that guttural ch represented as a single letter in any other language?' on a post https://eli.li/entry.php?id=20171207022312

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