Do you write acceptance tests? I write many of them, always using a spreadsheet. I'm curious to see if folks use other methods of capturing test requirements and results, though. A spreadsheet works, but hasn't ever felt like the right tool for this job.

My gut is to use an org file, but my coworkers aren't always on board with emacs nor org-mode.

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Jeena

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We mostly just write them in a Wiki as a table.

herself

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@eli I don’t write unit tests but am a tester! Spreadsheets aren’t perfect, but I prefer them to anything else. (My last non-contracting employer loved to send test documents to clients in word, urgh.) Anything else feels too unwieldy, even some of the more custom offerings like Test Studio. At least spreadsheets are quick to update, and are easy if you want to create some sort of traceability matrix for requirements, etc. Versioning is a pain, and commenting, but if I’m the only one using it then I always go that route.

herself

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@eli Or are you talking about User Acceptance Tests? That can be another story...

eli

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@herself yeah, I think I do mean more along the lines of user acceptance tests. I think you are right, though, spreadsheets are the way to go. I've used them for years, everyone else I kow who does this uses them. They're just the best tool for the job, even if they feel a little awkward at times.

herself

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@eli they are just so good with data manipulation. Short of a database, which would be too fiddly (and overkill)!

eli

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@herself :looks around nervously, then, in a whisper: I set up databases for all kinds of things because I like SQL better than VBA 😬

herself

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@eli hahaha! Good old VBA! I was the on-call person for a large government department in case Y2K wiped out all of their Access databases. 😂 As I remember it did have one good use- you could reprogram Clippy with it!

eli

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@herself Clippy, fueld by VBA!? What beautiful devilry!

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