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In reply to: GitHub - hundredrabbits/Noodle: Small, Sharp Sketch Tool

Noodle is a teeny tiny tool that lets you draw in the browser. Controls aren’t all that discoverable, but once you decipher the invisible UI it is an excellent little toy!

Try clicking and dragging around. Use the numbers 0 - 9 on your keyboard to toggle brush/line types.

In reply to: Kinopio

A very cool little tool to make mind maps in the browser! Wicked calm. Very elegant. Do recommend.

Today was relatively laid back at work so, I thought it would be interesting to spend the day in Acme, Plan9s text editor.

While I absolutely love emacs, I’m absolutely blown away by Acme. The interface is unlike anything else that I’ve ever used, but, at the same time, wicked quick to pick-up. There are a few niceties that other text editors offer that Acme doesn’t…but it is so easily extensible that I bet I could bake in what I want with an afternoon of fiddling.

I am excited to continue exploring Plan9 and Acme, and think I’m going to spend another day in it tomorrow!

Link logging

You all. A week! Maybe a few. They’ve been something else, for good and ill, fun and waaaha!?” A doozy. So, here is a doozy of a link log!

aerc; The world’s best email client

I haven’t given this a go, yet, but it looks pretty solid, and like a great/easier to use alternative to mutt or alpine.

Why I’m still using jQuery in 2019

I use jQuery just about every day, and, you know what…I really like it. 😬

Why You Should Buy Into the Emacs Platform

The title of this post is a we bit deceive-ious, it is more of a list of awesome emacs resources than a manifesto/proclamation on why you should” use emacs.

Welcome to Linux From Scratch!

Linux From Scratch (LFS) is a project that provides you with step-by-step instructions for building your own custom Linux system, entirely from source code.

Why Don’t Americans Use Their Parks At Night?

However cities want to encourage more park use at night, he stresses that they need to consult the community anchors” to ensure that it meets the needs of the entire neighborhood.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons will have skin tone customization, gender-neutral hairstyles for Villagers

This piece serves as a great follow up to this previously linked post from Austin Walker, Me, On The Screen: Race in Animal Crossing: New Leaf

Instant Pot Baked Potatoes Recipe

How to cook potatoes in an instant pot.

Is Robert’s Rules too Restrictive? Consider Martha’s Rules of Order for Meetings

See also, Martha’s Rules

Borough mayor is knitting to prove men speak too much at meetings

Montgomery said she is unfazed by criticism and will continue knitting until Christmas.

Knitting as both protest, and social signal.

Don’t slow that bus down, we’ve got places to be

But there’s a clear difference between Die Hard and Speed, […] Die Hard is about the individual — the lone wolf John McClaine, shooting his way through the terrorists — but Speed isn’t really about Reeves. It’s about the collective. It’s not just one of Keanu’s best movies; it’s one of the best movies about public transportation. Speed refutes one of the most pervasive myths about metropolitan transit systems in the U.S. — that no one rides the bus in Los Angeles — with its economically and racially diverse ensemble of riders, who must work together and with Jack Traven to keep the bus going until the bomb is dismantled.

Help For Werewolf

Werewolf! is a free-form social roleplaying game (kinda):

Be your own curator. Archivist.

Question: what is to be done with the stuff after it has been cataloged and stored? Are we pinning butterflies for the sake of pinning them, or is there a moment of beholding, and re-use/re-mix down the line?

Save and make? Transform?

I like to think of what I do with these link logs as part curation, part compost.

IBM and the Holocaust — why wasn’t this on my radar?

Juxtaposed: Wayfair workers plan walkout in protest of company’s bed sales to migrant camps.

Slight correction to CNNs title, though — migration camps” should be concentration camps.”

Atlanta’s Food Forest Will Provide Fresh Fruit, Nuts, and Herbs to Forage

Most of the trees in the forest are still too young to bear fruit. But once they become productive, about five years from now, McCord expects literal tons of fruit.”

Before you were here

[…] Needing to build your own website, setting up your own webservers, and using non-user friendly applications to transfer data not only meant that most early users had a better core understanding of the technology and what its future might bring, it also meant that users had a sense of ownership. They were shaping the medium they were consuming.

screenshots of despair

A catalog of little despair.

Fans Are Better Than Tech at Organizing Information Online

The first step to recovery is admitting that you have a problem. I, as exemplified by this very post, have a tagging problem.

Interesting also in the context of digital minimalism,” see Walking Alone: On Digital Minimalism”.

on dat://

@kicks offering the most cogent explanation of what the heck date:// actually is that I’ve found!

Ok, so how does Dat work exactly? It is simply a unique address attached to a folder of files (kind of like a ZIP file.) You then share that folder on the network and others can sync it to their system when they visit the unique address.

SwiftUI, Privacy, macOS, and the Web

A long, but worthwhile read.

The Future of Interaction, Part II

The most important part of this announcement is the abstraction they’re working with, not the view surface being used for rendering.

Wherein the abstraction becomes a tool for focusing on interaction, rather than specific implementation.

Adversarial Interoperability: Reviving an Elegant Weapon From a More Civilized Age to Slay Today’s Monopolies

What made iWork a success—and helped re-launch Apple—was the fact that Pages could open and save most Word files […]

[…] Apple didn’t just make an interoperable” product that worked with an existing product in the market: they made an adversarially interoperable product whose compatibility was wrested from the incumbent, through diligent reverse-engineering and reimplementation.

The New Wilderness

The need to regulate online privacy is a truth so universally acknowledged that even Facebook and Google have joined the chorus of voices crying for change […] No two companies have done more to drag private life into the algorithmic eye than Google and Facebook.

So why have the gravediggers of online privacy suddenly grown so worried about the health of the patient?

Part of the answer is a defect in the language we use to talk about privacy. That language, especially as it is codified in law, is not adequate for the new reality of ubiquitous, mechanized surveillance.

Continuing later,

The question we need to ask is not whether our data is safe, but why there is suddenly so much of it that needs protecting. The problem with the dragon, after all, is not its stockpile stewardship, but its appetite.

That Web Dev Thing Where Everybody Says Something Clever Involving Toast

Twitter is designed to escalate responses and keep people engaged. This has the effect of polarising discussions online which in turn has, in my mind, made it completely useless as a venue for discussing web development issues.

airtext

A decentralized blogging…thing…platform…service?

Link logging

How to land on the Moon

Diagrams. Many great diagrams. Even more switches. The quality of older NASA imagery is gorgeous. I’m always surprised by how non-clinical and how artful the compositions are.

BeepBox

For any lovers of nanoloop out there, this will be a nice little toy to play with.

For other fun game dev tools: Game Dev Tools for Raspberry Pi

(🎶 Here is a very tiny loop I made 👩‍🎤)

Tokyo became a megacity by reinventing itself

If you agree with Harvard economist Edward Glaeser that cities are humanity’s greatest invention, then Tokyo is perhaps our greatest example: a stunning metropolis, home to more than 37 million people and one of the world’s wealthiest, safest, most creative urban centers.

Even if you’re not particularly interested in how megacities shape human behavior, Tokyo is unavoidable—it has already changed your life. The city is the ultimate social influencer, the node through which the world connects to Japanese culture.

Seeking the Productive Life: Some Details of My Personal Infrastructure

…this is included for a single terrifying phone wallpaper. Scroll until you find it. It cannot be missed.

A play in a few acts:

  1. Colonialism is alive in the exploited tech work force
  2. The economics of package management
  3. ASDF, the version manager for all your languages
  4. Terry Pratchett Warns Of Online Fake News In 1995 Interview, Bill Gates Shoots Him Down
  5. Open gardens
  6. A highly opinionated guide to learning about ActivityPub
  7. Pleroma Hosting on Raspberry Pi
  8. Electric Zine Maker (early beta, be gentle, hug it often)

The cutting-edge of cutting: How Japanese scissors have evolved

I know of plenty of folks who like fancy stationary, pens, and pencils, but scissors seems much more up my alley, tbh.

The Invisible City Beneath Paris

I am a sucker for any sort of urban exploration stuff.

The Convivial Society, No. 17: Arduous Interfaces

And @kicks’ response, Reply: Arduous Interfaces. From the response:

We’ve long had some equivalent of Robert’s Rules of Order—now we see codes of conduct or forum guidelines. When we think of running an online group, we think of moderating’ it. Policing the conversations, cleaning up spam and so on. And this is fine: probably necessary and I wouldn’t have the foggiest idea of how to do it.

But I think we also need a librarian ethic somewhere among these groups. Maybe there are moderators out there who have this kind of commission. You are dealing with a community of writers, who are all filling the community up with their verbose output—this is all data that needs to be grappled with.

So, think of a librarian at work: putting books back under the proper heading, referring readers to specific titles, borrowing books from the outside—in fact, I wish communities were better about knowing what other communities are in the topical vicinity—to help everyone find themselves a home. (I do see this, though, in the Indieweb community—a person might be told to check out micro.blog or maybe TiddlyWiki. However, I think we’re lucky to be a meta-community.)

Toward the next generation of programming tools

I’ve long thought that the real next-generation programming language won’t be a rehash of LISP, C, or Smalltalk syntax. It won’t be character based at all: it will be visual. Rather than typing, we’ll draw what we want.

The Pizza Lab: Foolproof Pan Pizza

Make thee a pizza.

Black and white and RSS; Photos you can only see in a feed

Fans of RSS, unite!

Link logging

Bulletin Butter and Jelly

If I set up a BBS would you want in? What would you want to BBS about?”

Texting Means Never Having to Say Goodbye

I thought about the last time I’d actually typed ttfn. I imagine it was at least 18 years ago, on my family’s Gateway desktop during the era of dial-up AOL. And then I realized I couldn’t remember the last time I said g2g,” or even bye,” in an online conversation.

The medium is the message, and the message is nearly always deliverable. So easy to be alone when you can’t ever be apart. Never say good bye,” but are you then always alone?

Go! Make a game — play a game.

Report on Anthem’s development woes draws terse response from BioWare

Also see Jack de Quidt on this.

here’s the wild thing that it feels almost impossible to say in the games industry: the game doesn’t mean shit! it’s lights and colours! it’s nice to play one and it’s nice to make a good one, sure

but — and i mean this very sincerely — if the production of the object ruins the lives and health of the people making it, the object doesn’t mean shit! what — you shipped a fun mech game? or a good cowboy game? great. who’s taking medical leave?

All games are a mess

I love that strange homemade games like The Frogs Of War and Legacy Of The Golden Hammer exist, these unpolished mishmashes of ideas and design as a form of creative expression. Enjoying these games is a way to enjoy all games, to accept that everything is from the same cloth, a different flawed piece of creativity, a different glimpse into what can be created.

On Flooding: Drowning the Culture in Sameness

And how much discovery can there be, really, with the same critics occupying the same space?

Hard left turn to allow me to insert a different conversation/question at this point on algorithmic curation.

Does algorithmic curation cutout the human element in what would elsewise be an artistic effort of mixing, or does it simply push the person a little further away — algorithm programmer as space builder, and us the viewing audience” as participant in a shared effort of consumptive curation…

So, you know, Derrida?

\_(ツ)_/

The Roundups of SHACKLESHOTGUN

Also see @kicks on roundups. (Thanks for the link-love, btw! (I enjoy collecting things, and this exercise is a good way of scratching that itch. My favorite part of collecting is making the collage at the end — by putting disparate things in proximity to one another making a new thing. These posts are my trying to do that. If you are interested in the unfiltered stream oh-links that are eventually paired down to become this, check out my profile on reading.am))

Why there is so little left of the early internet

Sometimes the sites that are lost echo even more seismic changes; the deaths and births of nations themselves. It happened with Yugoslavia; .yu was the top-level domain for Yugoslavia, and that ended when it collapsed. There’s a researcher who is trying to rebuild what was there before the break-up,” she says.

Leverage Points: Places to Intervene in a System

Parameters are dead last on my list of powerful interventions. Diddling with the details, arranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. Probably 90, no 95, no 99 percent of our attention goes to parameters, but there’s not a lot of leverage in them.

Can we truly think about climate change at all?

Object Oriented Ontology says no. Enter the Hyperobjects.”

Make it hard to screw up driven development

This is the request web dev resources link.

ttfn

Interesting discovery of the evening: it looks like Firefox will soon be sending all DNS through Cloudflare to enforce DNS-over-HTTPS.

I guess this is good because it obscures DNS queries from ISPs, but maybe bad because it pipes all Firefox traffic through Cloudflare? Having mixed feelings.

While this behavior is on by default, it can be disabled in settings.

mozilla wiki:Trusted Recursive Resolver

Me, 4 weeks ago: pgAdmin3 is the one and only pgAdmin! pgAdmin 4 is an abomination unto the world

Also me, today: pgAdmin 4 is my everything 😍

Link logging

Tokyo Neapolitan: The New Wave of Japanese Pizza

If you are gonna do a thing, you might as well do that thing as well as you can. 🍕

The Famous Photo of Chernobyl’s Most Dangerous Radioactive Material Was a Selfie

…I looked through all the other captions of photos similar photos of the destroyed core, and they were all taken by Korneyev, so it’s likely this photo was an old-school timed selfie. The shutter speed was probably a little slower than for the other photos in order for him to get into position, which explains why he seems to be moving and why the glow from his flashlight looks like a lightning flash. The graininess of the photo, though, is likely due to the radiation.

Living Systems | James Grier Miller | 1978

Confession — I haven’t dug into this yet. As someone with 2 degrees in Human Ecology (e.g. the interdisciplinary study of people and our environment) I feel obligated to read this.

A bit more background on rights for nature.

Tending the Digital Commons: A Small Ethics toward the Future

What do I mean by the open Web”? I mean the World Wide Web as created by Tim Berners-Lee and extended by later coders. The open Web is effectively a set of protocols that allows the creating, sharing, and experiencing of text, sounds, and images on any computer that is connected to the Internet and has installed on it a browser that can interpret information encoded in conformity with these protocols.

In their simplicity, those protocols are relentlessly generative, producing a heterogeneous mass of material for which the most common descriptor is simply content.” It took a while for that state of affairs to come about, especially since early Internet service providers like CompuServe and AOL tried to offer proprietary content that couldn’t be found elsewhere, after the model of newspapers or magazines. This model might have worked for a longer period if the Web had been a place of consumption only, but it was also a place of creation, and people wanted what they created to be experienced by the greatest number of people possible. (As advertising made its way onto the Web, this was true of businesses as well as individuals.) And so the open Web, the digital commons, triumphed over those first attempts to keep content enclosed.

Autism from the inside

Reframing,

When I come across instances of this folk understanding of autism, I am reminded of Edward Said’s 1978 description of the orientalist gaze, in which the exoticised subjects endure a kind of fascinated scrutiny, and are then rendered without depth, in swollen detail’.

…In this anaerobic environment, the qualities routinely assigned to autistic people — lack of empathy, unworldliness, humourlessness, the inability to love — are the exact inverse of the qualities that a neurotypical society most prizes.

For a moment, let’s flip things over. To an autistic viewer like me, neurotypical life can seem astonishingly unemotional. I’m so overwhelmed by the sensory onslaught of a busy room that I’m almost tearful, while neurotypical folk appear to wade through clouds of sound, light and odour, entirely oblivious. It’s hard to resist the impression that they’re numb, or unreal somehow. They are certainly displaying a lack of affect in the face of extreme provocation. Where I am in constant movement; they are somehow still.

The incredible nature of Abstract Art and how it can change the way you think about everything.

The point of the art wasn’t what you saw on the original painting, but what it left behind after you had looked at it. The experienced stayed and lingered with you. I thought this was incredible, and beautiful and amazing.

Variations On A Utilitarian Theme

Read along, if you will, as I tell a little story of sorts through a series of excerpts. It is essentially a story about the links among prevalent trends involving surveillance, data, security, self-documentation, and happiness.

The Ones Who Walk Away From…Facebook

How I lost my legs and gained… you want me to say something inspiring here

Don’t miss the author’s sneaker reviews.

Component frameworks and web standards

This post has three parts: in the first, I look at what I like about the web standards stance” or a vanilla approach”. In the second, I share what I liked when I used a JavaScript component framework. In the last part, I look at whether these two approaches are actually different: maybe I assumed a false dichotomy?

How to master advanced TypeScript patterns

This Medium post sneaks in a pretty solid overview of currying (as I understand it, at least).

We Need Chrome No More

The dominance of Chrome has a major detrimental effect on the Web as an open platform: developers are increasingly shunning other browsers in their testing and bug-fixing routines. If it works as intended on Chrome, it’s ready to ship. This in turn results in more users flocking to the browser as their favorite Web sites and apps no longer work elsewhere, making developers less likely to spend time testing on other browsers. A vicious cycle that, if not broken, will result in most other browsers disappearing in the oblivion of irrelevance. And that’s exactly how you suffocate the open Web.

Flashback to the last week’s link log, from Choo’s documentation:

A fun way to think about browsers, is as a standardized Virtual Machine (VM) that includes high-level APIs to do networking, sandboxed code execution and disk access. It runs on almost every platform, behaves similarly everywhere, and is always kept backwards compatible.

The Super Tiny Compiler

Learn about compilers by reading through a very tiny one.

Dynamicland

Our mission is to incubate a humane dynamic medium whose full power is accessible to all people.

Field Guide to Bash Terminals

A bit shorter than the bash man page. Good, basic, info.

A Beginner’s Guide To Dragon Ball

The biggest lie you’ll ever hear about Dragon Ball from both fans and critics alike is that there are long stretches of episodes full of attacks charging and nothing else. It was something I had always heard about the show and was warned about when I decided to check it out. I waited and waited for these fabled episodes and by the end of DBZ, I realized they don’t exist

Once upon a time I watched a ton of Dragon Ball and One Piece…in French. They use the imperative tense a lot. I’d like to re-watch some of each in English one day.

Link logging

Mark’s bookmarklets

I like bookmarklets. I like that these are bookmarklets made by Mark. See also Mark’s Learn2JS.

Pixaki for iPad

This is an app that I have not tried, but that looks groovy if you are into creating pixel art.

Bad ethernet cable

Reminding us that it is important to remember that the medium is the message…especially when the message relies on a medium for transference.

SQL: One of the Most Valuable Skills

Leave your ORM at the door. SQL fo’ lyfe!

Opportunity did not answer NASAs final call, and it’s now lost to us

RIP. You were the best robot adventurer. You will be missed.

I’ve gone full Apocalypse Dad

I read this. It caused me to panic. Living in blissful ignorance and being busy with work and not having the money to actually really stockpile anything of usefulness is what keeps me from being a full on doomsday hoarder.

But responding to the possibility of the worst, by pursuing mere survival, seems a bit limited — even to the point of being paradoxical. Survival is conservative by nature: however bad the world might be, my best chances of surviving in it are by learning and respecting its rules. My best hopes at riding out any given disaster are if things, as far as possible, continue to follow laws and norms I already understand. And yet, the possibility of disaster is inherent to the world as it presently exists, as long as the world remains the same, that possibility will be there. In a way, then, the best thing to do would be to throw caution to the wind, to forget [mere] survival and embrace — as far as possible — radical change. Only then might we achieve a world in which we are genuinely safe, without ever needing to rely on mere survivalism again.

Hello. By the Way. Whatever.

Nora Ephron on blogging.

…one of the most delicious things about the profoundly parasitical world of blogs is that you don’t have to have anything much to say. Or you just have to have a little tiny thing to say. You just might want to say hello. I’m here. And by the way. On the other hand. Nevertheless. Did you see this? Whatever. A blog is sort of like an exhale.

Virginia Woolf on a similar topic:

Of all forms of literature, however, the essay is the one which least calls for the use of long words. The principle which controls it is simply that it should give pleasure; the desire which impels us when we take it from the shelf is simply to receive pleasure. Everything in an essay must be subdued to that end. It should lay us under a spell with its first word, and we should only wake, refreshed, with its last.

SPUDwrite is a DIY E Ink typewriter… with a printer… and an LCD display

An E Ink typewriter.

O Uommibatto”: How the Pre-Raphaelites Became Obsessed with the Wombat

I had no idea that wombats were so beloved by the Pre-Raphaelites!?

Wombat sketch by Edward Burne-Jones featured in Memorials of Edward Burne-Jones (1904) by Georgiana Burne-Jones

TYPE DESIGN, TYPOGRAPHY, TYPEFACES AND FONTS: An encyclopedic treatment of type design, typefaces and fonts. This site is also known as on snot and fonts.

Need I say more than this title?

Basic blot blogging from the command-line

Posting to my blog is a breeze from mobile thanks to a couple shortcuts and Drafts actions I’ve put together. I wanted posting to be just as seemless from my computer, too. Here is my quick and dirty solution!

#!/usr/bin/env bash

cd "$(dirname "$0")" # Go to the script's directory

DATE=$(date +%Y-%m-%d-%H-%M)

# The paths to your blot website's draft and post directories
DRAFT_DIR=/Users/someuser/Dropbox/Apps/Blot/drafts/
POST_DIR=/Users/someuser/Dropbox/Apps/Blot/posts/

USER_INPUT="$@"

# Your editor of choice
EDITOR='emacs'

if [ -n "$USER_INPUT" ]; then

    if [ $USER_INPUT == "post" ]; then

        printf "title: \ndate: ${DATE}\ntags: " > ${POST_DIR}${DATE}.md
        $EDITOR ${POST_DIR}$DATE.md

    fi

    if [ $USER_INPUT == "draft" ]; then

        printf "title: \ndate: ${DATE}\ntags: " > ${DRAFT_DIR}${DATE}.md
        $EDITOR ${DRAFT_DIR}$DATE.md

    fi

else 

    printf '\nBlot blogging from the command-line.\n\n    draft   create a draft post\n    post    live dangerously and just post that sucker!\n\n'

fi

In the future I may expand this to support editing existing posts, too. I’ve also been toying with a way to do this without ever leaving emacs.

After years and years of using figma, I purchased a copy of Sketch today. Boy-howdy. I made mockups of an app in about 1/3rd of the time it would have taken me using figma.

A few weeks ago I said I’d re-write my CMS by the end of the year.

The year ended (happy New Year, btw 🥳).

That has not happened.

I’ve come to a realization:

  • Yes, the code that runs my website is an atrocious embarrassment.
  • Yes, it works perfectly for what I need/want in a website.

In short, it is good enough. Good enough, however, ain’t good enough to share and encourage other folks to use. So, while my CMS may be good enough for me, I want to do more this year to see what I can do to help make the IndieWeb more accessible to anyone who wants in. I also just want to make more thing this year. Not big grand thing, but small fun things. To kick that off I’ve started to make a toy static site generator. It is called little, and it is not done.

Last night I decided to explore other task management solutions. I migrated all my todos from TodoTxt to Notion. After playing with Notion for a bit I then migrated all my tasks to Microsoft’s todo thingy-app…not wanting to break my streak I then migrated my tasks to my self-hosted trello clone. After playing around with that for a bit I figured why not just use emacs” and then re-formatted all of my TodoTxt tasks into Org-mode…so now I have all my tasks across a whole heap of platforms and I feel obligated to maintain them across all of them until I make a choice. WHAT HAVE I DONE!?

No description provided. I will be better about this in the future!

I don’t care if you think I’m a monster. I love leaving menu-bar-mode enabled in emacs.

A few years ago Tova digitized a collection of poems that her great grandfather wrote. She then got the scans printed and bound as a gift for her mother. This evening, at my mother-in-law’s request, I made a little website of those poems. It was a fun project I was able to tackle in about an hour.

First I uploaded the PDF to archive.org and Google Drive, then I used pdf2htmlEX to convert the PDF into a webpage. I then threw together a little wrapper webpage to make pdf2htmlEX’s output a tiny bit prettier, and published the whole kit-and-caboodle using surge.sh.

In reply to: Database Flow

Database Flow is one of the most powerful and easy to use data analytics tools I’ve ever seen (assuming you have a solid grasp of either or both SQL and GraphQL).

Spacemacs forever!

This is a test post from my newly self-hosted instance of Quill! Including a shout-out to @aaronpk for building it, and to @alans for giving me the push I needed to make it happen 🎉

Pandoc and the wicked simple build system

I recently added a /now page to my website. I set out to make it as easy as possible to update, and am pleased with the results!

Sitting in a folder in Dropbox on my computer is a directory, now. Within now are 2 files, index.html and index.markdown. Same content, different formats.

After I update the content of index.markdown I’m able to run a very tiny shell script, bound to the alias now, that does 2 things:

  1. It converts the markdown file to html using Pandoc and a simple template
  2. It uploads the newly minted index.html file to my server using scp

Who needs a CMS when you’ve got Pandoc? 🤷‍♂️

I considered simplifying” the build process even further by triggering the rebuild/upload process on file change, but decided that it wasn’t really worth the extra effort, and I like having to type $ now into the command line.

…granted, this does interfere with my use of Zeits now utility, doesn’t it? Welp! I’ll cross that bridge when I get to it, I guess 🌮

In reply to: Flutter - Beautiful native apps in record time

I’ve been reading a bit about flutter, a tool for cross platform development in Dart. I am intrigued…mostly because I think it may be a trojan horse. I think that beside iOS and Android as build targets, flutter will be able to build against Fuchsia down the road. It could be a way of coaxing/easing devs into the Fuchsia/Dart ecosystem.

In reply to: Key Lesson: Building CloudRepo With Clojure

In Clojure, if you adopt the Data is the API paradigm then designing systems is primarily about identifying your data and how it flows through your functions. Data can be represented by a small set of abstractions, in particular a map, and so would reduce the requirement to write the glue code that is so commonplace in Java (a.setFoo(b.getFoo) , etc.).

Also, if functional programming is your jam, don’t miss this article’s use of Data Flow diagrams to describe Clojure code 💯

Eyeballs and vampires and vim and 14px font

My vim set up as of 2018-01-23, featuring lisp koans

I’ve got pretty poor eyesight. This being the case, I often keep font sizes cranked up to at least 18px. Lately, though, I’ve needed to be able to see more of a file’s contents than my measly screen will accommodate, so I’ve been experimenting with how small I can keep my font and still see anything.

14px is the number I’ve settled on. This change, paired with my passionate romancing of all things Lisp lately, has lead me to re-enable syntax highlighting, as well. I’m not 100% certain why I disabled it…but I did (probably the fault of some blog post I read once upon a time). I actually re-enabled it a while ago, when I started my new job — I was embarrassed whenever someone else would look at my screen and not be able to find some variable I had a question about — but used a pretty minimal theme.

A couple of weeks ago I switched to the github theme…this morning, however. I decided to go all in and start using dracula everywhere — terminal, vim (I thought this list was going to be longer…but that is really it 🤷‍♂️). So far, I’m wicked pleased. I’ve worked with this setup all day, and felt good about what I can see without toooooo much squinty or ⌘+ing.

P.S. Shoutout to lisp koans featured in the screenshot

While reading Clojure for the Brave and True, I’ve also been working my way through the lisp koans. At this point I’m pretty obsessed with lisps, and am growing increasingly excited to use one for a project. Generally speaking, I feel most cozy working with a really small (some would say constrained?”) toolset. Lisps most totes fulfill this coziness.

After a long time of using fish, and before that zsh I’ve returned to being a full time bash user. There was no particular rhyme nor reason to my using one shell over another, so in an effort to simplify my setup across my two computers and the heaps of servers I interact with on the daily I’ve gone all in on bash.

Jupiter@pizza:~$ 

A large part of my job boils down to fighting with Javascript carousel frameworks. Slick is the one I’ve had the best luck with so far. Anyone have any favorites or recommendations?

Since starting my new job I’ve kept an active rotation of text editors and IDEs. On Mondays I use Sublime Text, on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays I use Vim (well, Neo Vim) and on Fridays I either go back to Sublime Text or use Visual Studio Code. It just sort of happened, but now has become a fun experiment in contextual productivity.

No description provided. I will be better about this in the future!

Sublime Text 3.0 features many new features and improvements…also a new icon. Griping about change is a bit passé, but here I am. Gripers gotta gripe. I realize that this is only a logo, and that they can be changed by the user…but this is a demonstrably terrible logo. Firstly, the old logo communicated something about the app. It was a key cap, much like the ones that must be tapped and poked to use sublime text. This new logo is abstract to the point of near meaninglessness. And while icons needn’t always carry meaning this icon seems a little blind to what meaning it edges against. Beyond being vaguely reminiscent of the cool s, it also looks a heap like a broken capital N, or, you know, a bit like the insignia of the Schutzstaffel, or SS. Does any of this matter in the long run? Probably not, but iconography can help to shape the personality of a product (see Susan Kare’s work for Apple). Product design and app development aren’t purely technical. There is also a good bit of theatre involved. The set needs to be dressed.

Stupid-simple bash script to create a local copy of a website

#!/bin/bash

printf "\n\n    Please enter the URL of the website you wish to download.\n    Do not include leading 'http://' or 'https://'?\n\n\n"
printf "    "
read URL
printf "\n\n    Depending on the size of the website you just\n    entered, this may take a few minutes.\n\n\n"
sleep 6
wget --recursive --no-clobber --page-requisites --html-extension --convert-links --restrict-file-names=windows --domains ${URL} --no-parent http://${URL}
printf "\n\n  DONE!\n\n\n"

All the heavy lifting is done by wget, so that will need to be installed before using the script

Hackintosh, day 1

I finished setting up the Hackintosh and worked from it all day today. It. Was. Awesome. This machine is absolutely beastly in comparison to the late 2012 Mac Mini I’ve been rocking as my full-time work machine for the past few years.

RIP Mini :’(

The Mini was getting a wee bit long in the tooth so I have been working from my MacBook Air more often than not. I’m excited to get back to working at a proper desktop machine. I’m a bajillion times more productive, and I like having a dedicated work space—it makes it easier to walk away and stop working when the day is done.

So far running the Hackintosh (thinking of calling it a PineApple…becuase it is sort of like a mac and I’m in Maine…get it, get it?) has been a breeze. I anticipated more hoops would need to be jumped through, but so far sailing has been smooth. Tonymacx86 is a veritable wizard’s tome of helpful applications, how-to documentation and troubleshooting tips.

I also took this opportunity to reevaluate what tools I need and where.

Here is a quick list of what I’ve installed on the machine so far:

  • iTerm2, a co-worker turned me on to iTerm, I’ve become addicted to its mouse support for specific tasks ( e.g. clicking on links in IRC chats)
  • Homebrew, because I literally don’t know how to run a mac without it
  • Vim and my beloved .vimrc, of course
    • vundle.vim, my script installer of choice
    • Also installed neovim. Gonna give it a spin
  • Microsoft Office Suite (because work demands that I do so). I typically use Mutt or Mail.app for email and plaintext for everything and anything else that I can
  • Dropbox
  • nvAlt, which I use as a programming wiki/notebook
  • Adium, it may be old…neigh, ANCIENT, but I haven’t found a better IRC GUI
  • Transmit, the single greatest FTP client in the UNIVERSE. @ me!
  • KeePassX, because I ditched LastPass a few months ago, and haven’t looked back
  • Keybase, so so so fine for managing all the .ssh stuff
  • Sublimetext, because sometimes it is nice to be able to click on stuff
  • Xcode, of course
  • Visual Studio, again, becuase work demands it
  • pgweb, for all my database-y tasks
  • ImageOptim
  • Firefox
  • Chrome, for testing
  • MAMP
  • PasteBot, I started using this when the public beta was released a few months back after having never used a clipboard manager before. Life changing. World changing.
  • Toggl’s desktop client, because I gotta keep track of what I work on and when
  • GPG Keychain
  • Node, and a couple of node packages:
  • weechat, for when Adium dies ☠️
  • Hack Font, my favorite fixed width, powerline font

The big new thing I installed was fish, instead of my normal bash config. I’ve been reading a lot about fish lately, and like its scripting syntax…also autocomplete is pretty luscious.

I consciously didn’t install any graphics software on this machine. My thinking is twofold: a) I loathe doing graphics work, and much prefer to do it in code if I can, b) I’m going to do what graphics work I need to on my Macbook Air because I’m a lot quicker with the touchpad than a normal mouse.

…I also haven’t installed Spotify yet because I don’t have any speakers 🌽

Installing Visual Studio while deciding whether to hackintosh or iMac. ⚖️

Exporting a database from phpMyAdmin always feels like the wrong move.